The Pantone postcard project

Earlier this year I received a box of around 50 postcards, all of different Pantone colors, from a good friend of mine.

Without much thought I realized these cards lend themselves to having collages created on these colorful backgrounds. So without any planning I went to work using up scraps and little paper bits to create some collage art.

I started with using no more than 3 pieces per collage, like I did with this blue one.

I’m not sure what to do with the cards once I’m done. The initial plan was to mail them off to mail-art friends. Now that I’ve got a collection of them I’m reluctant to break them up. I could punch a hole in the corner and put them on a ring, or put them all in an album. But wait a minute… . Why are people like that? Why do we want to collect things and hold on to them?

No, I’ve got enough things that I’m holding on to. I’m going to be firm and mail these off. I can keep the pictures though.

 

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Global Priority Mail journal

Recently I put together a postal-themed journal for a postal-friend of mine who has sent me some wonderful no-longer-in-use forms and papers from the USPS. I constructed the cover using a flat Global Priority Mail envelope that I cut down for the front and back.

I used another envelope to cut the length of the spine. I used a piece of Tyvek sandwiched between the 3 cover pieces, and cardboard I used as a backing and to make it more sturdy. The Tyvek allows it to bend at the hinges to make a cover (See my post on making journal covers if this makes no sense to you and you want to read more).

After I sewed in the three signatures to make up the journal, I asked some fellow mail artists to make some postcards to include in the journal.

The whole thing came out beautifully and I was so excited to mail it off to its destination in Tennessee.

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The recipient loved it, I am happy to share. She sent me a wonderful response saying, “There has never been one made that is more loved or appreciated than this one!”

I’m so pleased 🙂

Postage stamp art

In the last few months I’ve been playing with postage stamps, using them in collages and art projects here and there. A very talented artist and a friend of mine who is very interested in working with postage stamps, has been working on a postage stamp glue book that I fell in love with.

I’ve been holding on to the perfect little travel notebook that I found in a giftshop some years ago and there I began experimenting with series postage stamps, paint, and pigment color.

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These “painted” pages are a little more time consuming, though I thoroughly enjoyed working on them, but I also wanted to do more straight gluing of stamps in groups. These have been a lot of fun to make. I’ve only started. I’ve got a lot more to do.

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I get the stamps from a couple of different places. Ebay, of course, is an obvious place to search for stamps in large quantities. They are relatively cheap and there is such variety to choose from. I also get some stamps from my local stamp club. It’s worth it to do a little research to find out what kind of stamp connections you might have near by. I’ve also attended my first stamp show not too long ago and enjoyed it. It definitely was a new experience.

I love working with postage stamps though I have to stress that I am not a collector. I’m not looking to have anything of value. I like to sort by theme and color, and I like the cheapest stamps best. That way there is no guilt when I glue them with a glue stick into my pages.

 

Getting started with collage art

dancer

Collage art has become a very important type of art that I work on. The more I do it, the more I love it.

When I started doing collages a few years ago I had no idea how to begin or what to do. Now that I have reached a stage where I am much more comfortable and confident in creating collage art,  I’d like to pass along some advice for anyone who is new to collaging, or looking for new inspiration to do collage art and glue books.

Based on feedback comments on my youtube videos, I see two types of groups interested in collage art. First are people who have valuable, family history pieces like photos, letters or documents, and want to display them in some kind of collection, like in a journal for example.

Second, are people who simply want to use up scraps, images they’ve torn from magazines, leftover project remnants, or whatever paper ephemera they have on hand to fill up a page. It’s this second group I will be focusing on in this post (I’ll get to the first group at another time).

One of the great things about doing art is the sense of accomplishment after a project is done. I feel that sense of accomplishment after I complete a collage, and it doesn’t matter how big or how little it is. A collage can be done on a canvas or a journal page. It can also be done on a postcard, index card, or a playing card. It can be great for people who feel like they don’t have a lot of time to devote to art but feel the need to do something creative.

Here are collages on index cards.

index card art

A low stress, exercise collage book, as a way to relax and have fun using up scraps is a great project to take up. It’s also a great place for you to experiment with your creativity and practice improving on how you put your collages together. You won’t always love what you create but practicing what you do will make you better.

So what kind of paper should you use for glue books and collaging?  

For me it’s good to have a mix of things like text, illustrations, images, color, black and white, paint, handwriting, etc, but  paper choice is arbitrary. As individuals we are drawn to things that interest us. The reason why you like something may or may not be important, and often it’s better not to think too deeply when considering what to save or not. For me, it’s a split-second decision to keep something or discard it. If I pause longer than a few seconds or come back for a second look, it’s worth keeping.  

If you are starting out fresh and need some ideas of where to look for paper ephemera and scraps, here are my notes:

Where should you make your collages?

You’ve got many choices here. I mentioned before, you can go as large as a canvas, or as small as an index card, or smaller. My friend Pamela has a Rolodex project with a collection of collages on hundreds of Rolodex cards.

Pamela rolodex project

If you want to create a book or journal, I recommend starting off with something simple. Craft stores or discount retailers like Target have basic 5 x 7″ journals in their bargain bins that you can get for a dollar. These are good because you are going to be tearing out pages to thin out the book. For every page, tear out 3. It seems like a lot of pages you are getting rid of, but your little book will have a big alligator mouth unless you take drastic measures.

If you’re starting a brand new collage project, it’s good to remind yourself of what your plans and goals will be. Here’s a forward I wrote to myself.

art book - forward

For a more in-depth look on creating a collage book, as well as my thoughts on how much is enough when it comes to scraps, please see the video I made.

Piecing together a collage journal

The longer I experiment with collage art, the more fun it gets. It’s funny how little bits of paper can get me so excited and enthusiastic about the art of making a journal.

Previously I wrote about my trip to San Francisco in January to visit my friend and fellow correspondence-art artist Pamela, and how I fell in love with her collage book made with Reader’s Digest covers. I was very much inspired to make my own, and that’s what I’ve done here. Pamela got me started by giving me extra covers she had on hand, and then cutting down some file folders to make the pages. Once the pages were hole punched and everything assembled with rings, I was ready to go.

covers with rings

With this journal, the covers were no work at all. Reader’s Digest books, like this one from the 1970s, can be found in abundance at any thrift store. I didn’t like the rings at first, but now I can see that they are pretty useful in being able to move collages around. I’ve seen people use twine or other heavy fibers to bind hole-punched pages like in this journal. I might try that next time.

I didn’t have any themes in mind as I was creating, I simply wanted to use papers from authentic sources; no images from a craft paper pad or digital printouts. I used some vintage papers like from old books, but I also used things like postcards I have received in the mail over the past year, receipts from places I shopped, maps, forms, photographs, and postage stamps, of course. I also used washi tape and rubber stamps with ink.

folk maiden of war

More of the pages are here:

 

 

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Video is here:

I’ve been inspired

Last Saturday I took a day-trip to San Francisco to meet my friend Pamela. Pamela is an amazing collage artist  — one of the most talented that I know. We’ve discovered that we share a similar style, or at least are drawn to similar types of images and illustrations.

We’ve been admiring each other’s work for several months now and knew that if we’d get together we’d have a lot to talk about, so when we made arrangements for me to come up to her studio I was so giddy, I couldn’t resist telling my kids, “Mommy’s got a play-date on Saturday!”

Her workspace is filled with so much inspiration and neat projects. Here’s some of the loveliness on her desk.

Pamela's desk

And her tower of index cards. I love all those tabs.

index card tower

One of her awesome projects to make a piece of art on a Rolodex card, every single day.

Rolodex card art

Other artists also contribute to her collection, including me (yay!). She’s been doing this for a couple of years so her collection is extensive. See her blog post for more amazing photos. All those cards represent a work of art. It’s astounding, really. It would take a pleasant period of time to go through them all. I’d love to do that some morning, along with a cup of tea.

Rolodex collection

Another of her interests is in correspondence art, and actually this is where our paths crossed. We share a love of all things postal, so of course I wanted to see art she makes, she collects, and some of the ephemera she has for creating more.

letters and glassine

postage stamp book

Here are some of the postcards she has received from all over the world.

mail call

Field Notes

Another project that is very unique is her work on altered passports. She takes an old passport and tells a story with photos and ephemera of where this person has traveled. It’s so creative! Read her description of how she comes up with the ideas on her blog. I want to create something with one of my old passports. I’m going to do some studying of these for a while first.

 

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She also has glue books that I found fascinating. The covers come from hardcover Reader’s Digest compilations.

 

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All in all, we had a wonderful time. I brought some of my journals to share so with all of our sharing we didn’t have that much time to create. That’s ok. We’re going to do it again someday 🙂

rubber stamps

bingo cards

gummed labels

 

The Little red book

red stencil and postcard

Red is my favorite color. Even from my earliest years, red was the first color out of the crayon box. I’ve wanted to make a little art journal with a red theme for some time now and decided the time was right after I found these index cards at a used book sale.

index cards

The cardstock is so dense and heavy — ideal for book covers. I took 4, cut off the tabs and then painted them in reds. After the paint was dry I used rubber stamps and black ink to cover the surfaces from corner to corner.

I used a little Tim Holtz grunge board over the spine. It didn’t need the extra reinforcement but I just liked how it looked, especially after I put the silver and gunmetal brads along the borders.

little red jj cover

I used a watch piece that I attached to the cover as the fixed portion of the fastener. I glued a few “jewels” on the piece to give it a little more sparkle. On the bottom portion of the watch piece is stamped, “U.S.A. PAT. MAY. 24. 1904” It also says “7 jewels” in fancy lettering. So neat!

watch jewels

On the inside I have some of tea-dyed pages but also added papers from several different sources. Mostly it’s recycled book pages, and art scrap pages. In all there are 3 signatures that I stitched in using the 5-point pamphlet stitch.

I wanted to include a lot more art in this journal. Sometimes I created the art myself with ink or paints, or collaging. Other times, if I found beautiful images of art or pictures from magazines that work with the page layouts, I used those types as art.

 

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I added small bits here and there from postage stamps, pieces of decoupaged napkin, vintage lace, ribbon, postcards, playing cards, rubber stamping, a few die-cuts, and washi tape.

It’s a very busy book, which is exactly what I wanted. I’m still adding to it and will be for a while.

 

Another mail-art junk journal

mail art junk journal 2

I’ve been receiving so many postcards and beautiful envelopes filled with such lovely mail art that I decided I needed a “book” to contain it all. That the was the inspiration for putting together this junk journal.

In addition to that, I’ve been steadily going through my postage stamps and when I found blocks or groupings of stamps on paper I found ways to include them in my journal.

mail art junk journal 1

mail art junk journal 3

There is so much color in this book, and so much to look at. I never get bored thumbing through the pages.

The cover was made with a large manila envelope. It came in the mail with some kind of advertisement that I didn’t keep, but I thought the envelope might be good for something, so I kept it. At first I painted it with red, blue, lilac, and beige acrylic paint.

cover mail art jj

After that I collaged it with random bits of rubber stamped papers. I rubber stamped on top of that, and then added blocks of cancelled US postage stamps.

close up of the cover

I used a varnish as a top coat and added a little brown paint into the varnish just to mute and blend the colors a little. After everything was dry, I sprayed a little gold mist just to add another element of interest.

A friend of mine from the mail art group I hang out with sent me a bunch of old postal forms she received from someone who works at the post office and knew she was interested in those kinds of things. She sent very neat pieces to me and I dispersed as many as I could within the pages.

mail art junk journal 4

This political campaign mailing tag is cool, as well as the dispatch unit postmark slip on the facing page.

mail art junk journal 5

Here are a few more pages

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And here is the flip through in its entirety:

A Journal from envelopes

envelope journal - cover

I’ve broken a personal record for the amount of time it took me to make a little journal: almost no time at all.

No sewing, no stitching, nothing complicated. It’s just envelopes, washi tape, and decorative embellishments.

envelope journal pages 1

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envelope journal pages 3

envelope journal pages 4

envelope journal pages 5

envelope journal pages 6
I’ve been admiring these little journals made from junk-mail envelopes for some time. Of course I’m not the first; not even the second. Shannon Green made a really elaborate one with lots of doodling and drawing. Hopefully I’ll fill this one up similarly!

Here’s my flip through: